Our five faves at SWELL Sculpture Festival

Currumbin Rock – Boy by Phillip and Alex Piperides
Prickles the Unhugable Bear by Dion Parker and Andrew Cullen
Trafficking by Clayton Blake
Foci by Karl Meyer
Fantastic Plastic – Land, Sea and Air Penetrator by Cate Collopy

Hooray for spring and all of the sweet soirees it brings us. Particularly those of the beachside, art installation variety.

Which leads us to the purpose of this tale…SWELL Sculpture Festival is back and bigger than ever and we are absolutely PUMPED.

The annual art festival kicks off on Friday September 14th and if there has ever been an idea better than sculptures on the sand, we are not aware of it.

In celebration of the epic event, we’ve chosen five sculptures we absolutely love, all with strong messages about the current state of the world, to get you excited too.

Foci by Karl Meyer
This stunning piece is set into the sand with a backdrop of the Surfers skyline to enhance it’s beauty. Foci expresses unfolding and growth with the work, building a sense of opening and expansion suggestive of the wider natural world. The shell shape represents marine forms and invertebrates in particular and the balance of the sculpture reflects the symmetry of nature. LOVE.

Currumbin Rock – Boy by Phillip and Alex Piperides
Sculptures placed on top of Elephant Rock are always some of the most eye-catching and powerful. This piece is a reflection of the playful activities children undergo on a daily basis. The artists want to show that children’s’ creative manner goes unseen by those around them. A delightful concept.

Trafficking by Clayton Blake
A sculpture with a very important message, Trafficking was created to draw attention to human trafficking, the third largest international crime industry. 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders every year, 80% of which are female. The number excludes the millions already held captive by trafficking. A powerful piece that will certainly receive the recognition it deserves.

Prickles the Unhugable Bear by Dion Parker and Andrew Cullen
Oh Prickles is a cutie, we’d hug you big guy. Still the message behind him is a good one. What was once cherished and lovingly repaired by hand when broken is now cast aside. In its’ place we have newer, better devices offering a world where imagination is unnecessary and hugs are doled out via emojis. A big, unmissable nod to the pitfalls of our consumerist culture.

Fantastic Plastic – Land, Sea and Air Penetrator by Cate Collopy
A colourful and piece created to show the durability of plastic and how it has successfully penetrated land, sea, air, animal and human life. Collopy explains that in just 150 years plastic has manipulated our world and seen us become completely dependent on a substance that cannot be broken down. Another epic message.

It’s obviously going to be a great festival guys, make sure you get down to Currumbin beachfront to support our local arts and culture scene.

Words and photos by Kirra Smith

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